March Madness Fans Seriously Love Tweeting

Basketball, Social Media

While the Dayton Flyers have been flying past the competition to make it to the Elite 8, their fans have been flying to Twitter to tweet about all the Madness. According to Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings, 143,000 unique users tweeted about the Dayton upset of Stanford on March 27. These 231,000 total tweets were seen by an unique audience of 5.3 million people, generating 32.3 million Twitter TV impressions.

In fact, on March 27, the top four tweeted about sporting events were all four NCAA March Madness Men’s Basketball games. The only non-NCAA sporting event that made it into the daily top five was the Washington Nationals and New York Mets pre-season baseball game.  Despite making it into the top five, the Nationals-Mets game was tweeted about far less than any of the either games with roughly 110,000 less tweets and 64,000 less unique authors than the San Diego State vs. Arizona game, which was the fourth most tweeted about sporting event that day.

For the week ending March 23, which saw 52 NCAA Men’s Basketball games played, 9 out of the Top 10 tweeted about sporting events were all March Madness matchups. The only non-March Madness game cracking the Top 10 that week was the Real Madrid CF vs. FC Barcelona soccer match on March 23, which came in at number seven. The most tweeted about game that week was the takedown of the Duke Blue Devils by the Mercer Bears. Upwards of 473,000 unique users tweeted 895,000 times about the upset. This produced an unique audience of about 7.8 million viewers and 80.2 million Twitter TV impressions. The next closest game was the Kentucky vs. Wichita State matchup which saw 304,000 unique users tweet 665,000 times about the game. The top four tweeted about events that week (including the two aforementioned, Dayton vs. Ohio State, and Dayton vs. Syracuse) all had more tweets that were tweeted by a larger amount of unique users than the Dayton vs. Stanford game on March 27.

Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings were first introduced in October 2013. They measures the total activity and reach of TV-related chatter on Twitter and are built on the SocialGuide platform. Unique authors are accounts that have sent out at least one tweet relating to a specific TV program or sporting event. Additionally, impressions are the number of times any of those tweets were seen while the unique audience is calculated as the total number of distinct Twitter accounts that garnered at least one impression of one or more different Tweets credited to a specific episode or sporting event. All the statistics for these games are credited to Nielsen SocialGuide.

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