Category Archives: Finance

Most Profitable #6

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #6 Alabama

Most Profitable #6I recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

Now, I’m breaking down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013. I’ve already posted #1 (Texas), #2 (Michigan), #3 (Georgia), #4 (Florida) and #5 LSU.

#6 Alabama

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $36,199,233.00
Student Fees $0.00
Guarantees $0.00
Contributions $18,864,861.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $203,412.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions $15,832,996.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $7,248,639.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $46,467.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $1,297,257.00
Sport Camps $584,616.00
Endowment and Investment Income $311,143.00
Other $8,097,317.00
TOTAL $88,685,941.00

Football Expenses

Athletic Student Aid (i.e., tuition, room and board) $3,632,607.00
Guarantees (amounts paid to visiting teams) $2,475,000.00
Head Coach Salary/Benefits/Bonuses $6,385,824.00
Asst Coaches Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $5,571,481.00
Support Staff Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $2,896,666.00
Severance Payments $141,476.00
Recruiting $983,721.00
Team Travel $3,432,188.00
Equipment, Uniforms and Supplies $1,576,657.00
Game Expenses $2,918,745.00
Fundraising, Marketing and Promotion $4,273,408.00
Sport Camps $647,774.00
Direct Facilities, Maintenance and Rental (costs charged to athletics for building and grounds maintenance, utilities, rental fees, operating leases, equipment repair and maintenance, and debt service) $2,579,734.00
Spirit Groups (support for bands, cheerleaders, mascots, dancers, etc.) $229,553.00
Indirect Facilities and Administrative Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the institution and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Medical Expenses and Medical Insurance $1,237,426.00
Memberships and Dues $2,506.00
Other $2,565,174.00
TOTAL $41,549,940.00

 

Alabama’s $47.1 million in net revenue from football is good enough for sixth in the nation behind Texas, Michigan, UGA, Florida and LSU. It was also plenty to cover the $14.9 million lost by sports other than football and men’s basketball (which had $5.8 million in net revenue). However, Alabama also reported $44.9 million in operating expenses not attributed to just one sport, offset by only $34 million in non-attributed revenue.

Like the other five athletic departments I’ve detailed at the top of this list, Alabama contributed back to the University for non-athletic initiatives to the tune of $5.9 million. After its expenses, the Crimson Tide reported $21.2 million in net revenue for the athletic department in 2012-2013.

Need Alabama football tickets?

The data presented here comes from financial reports the schools file with the NCAA. You may notice the numbers vary slightly from the Department of Education data I shared on Smarty Cents, but that’s because the reporting guidelines are slightly different. The reports filed with the NCAA are more accurate, but unfortunately they’re unavailable for private universities, because they aren’t subject to public records requests. Accordingly, I created the Top 10 list using Department of Education data (which does include private universities), but I’m sharing with you the more detailed data from the reports filed with the NCAA.

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Most profitable #5

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #5 LSU

Most profitable #5I recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

For 10 business days, I’m going to break down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013. I’ve already posted #1 (Texas), #2 (Michigan), #3 (Georgia) and #4 (Florida).

#5 LSU

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $33,171,661.00
Student Fees $0.00
Guarantees $0.00
Contributions $21,786,240.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $635,895.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions $15,913,422.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $0.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $2,768,620.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $0.00
Sport Camps $0.00
Endowment and Investment Income $0.00
Other $0.00
TOTAL $74,275,838.00

Football Expenses

Athletic Student Aid (i.e., tuition, room and board) $3,080,962.00
Guarantees (amounts paid to visiting teams) $2,885,000.00
Head Coach Salary/Benefits/Bonuses $4,290,781.00
Asst Coaches Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $5,871,695.00
Support Staff Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $1,520,744.00
Severance Payments $8,398.00
Recruiting $577,442.00
Team Travel $1,036,267.00
Equipment, Uniforms and Supplies $1,133,395.00
Game Expenses $886,826.00
Fundraising, Marketing and Promotion $194,927.00
Sport Camps $0.00
Direct Facilities, Maintenance and Rental (costs charged to athletics for building and grounds maintenance, utilities, rental fees, operating leases, equipment repair and maintenance, and debt service) $14,784.00
Spirit Groups (support for bands, cheerleaders, mascots, dancers, etc.) $0.00
Indirect Facilities and Administrative Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the institution and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Medical Expenses and Medical Insurance $176,138.00
Memberships and Dues $35,609.00
Other $4,109,260.00
TOTAL $25,822,228.00

The Tigers banked $48.5 million in net revenue from football in 2012-2013 – plenty to cover the $15.7 million lost by sports other than football and men’s basketball (which had $2.6 million in net revenue). However, LSU also reported $50 million in expenses not attributed to just one sport, offset by only $26.9 million in non-attributed revenue.

Like the other four athletic departments I’ve detailed at the top of this list, LSU contributed back to the University for non-athletic initiatives. The Tigers inked a check for $4.7 million and ended the 2012-2013 reporting year $7.5 million in the black.

Need LSU football tickets?

The data presented here comes from financial reports the schools file with the NCAA. You may notice the numbers vary slightly from the Department of Education data I shared on Smarty Cents, but that’s because the reporting guidelines are slightly different. The reports filed with the NCAA are more accurate, but unfortunately they’re unavailable for private universities, because they aren’t subject to public records requests. Accordingly, I created the Top 10 list using Department of Education data (which does include private universities), but I’m sharing with you the more detailed data from the reports filed with the NCAA.

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Most Profitable #4

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #4 Florida

Most Profitable #4I recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

For 10 business days, I’m going to break down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013. I’ve already posted #1#2 and #3.

#4 Florida

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $21,390,665.00
Student Fees $0.00
Guarantees $500,000.00
Contributions $34,052,885.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $200,000.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions $16,815,708.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $0.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $1,060,624.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $825,582.00
Sport Camps $172,094.00
Endowment and Investment Income $0.00
Other $2,729.00
TOTAL $75,020,287.00

Football Expenses

Athletic Student Aid (i.e., tuition, room and board) $2,490,319.00
Guarantees (amounts paid to visiting teams) $2,700,000.00
Head Coach Salary/Benefits/Bonuses $3,063,405.00
Asst Coaches Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $3,899,761.00
Support Staff Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $1,475,809.00
Severance Payments $146,643.00
Recruiting $687,227.00
Team Travel $3,525,976.00
Equipment, Uniforms and Supplies $602,848.00
Game Expenses $4,024,092.00
Fundraising, Marketing and Promotion $223,983.00
Sport Camps $171,209.00
Direct Facilities, Maintenance and Rental (costs charged to athletics for building and grounds maintenance, utilities, rental fees, operating leases, equipment repair and maintenance, and debt service) $928,616.00
Spirit Groups (support for bands, cheerleaders, mascots, dancers, etc.) $847,035.00
Indirect Facilities and Administrative Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the institution and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Medical Expenses and Medical Insurance $279,007.00
Memberships and Dues $0.00
Other $838,623.00
TOTAL $25,904,553.00

 

If you’ve done the math, you noticed football produced excess revenue of $49.1 million. What happens to that money? Along with excess revenue from men’s basketball, it essentially funded the rest of the athletic department, which includes 523 total student athletes. Sports outside of football and men’s basketball operated at a total loss of $46.7 million, and the department had another $47 million in expenses not directly attributable to just one team, including nearly $16 million in facilities expenses (rent, utilities, maintenance, etc.).

Florida athletics also reported contributing $7.6 million to the University of Florida for non-athletic initiatives. However, thanks to $28 million in revenue not directly attributable to one sport, including nearly $6 million in endowment and investment income, and almost $16 million from television and radio (not generated at the conference level but from UF’s individual deals) and royalties/licensing revenue, the athletic department had overall net revenue of $15.5 million after its contribution to the University.

So, Florida athletics has excess revenue of $15.5 million just padding its bank account, right? Not really. It’s important to note $11.3 million of the revenue reported for 2012-2013 was generated from capital contributions – in other words, fundraising campaigns specifically for facilities projects. According to audited financials, those capital contributions were raised for the renovation of the Stephen C. O’Connell Center, the “Gateway of Champions” football front door project, renovation of the Carse swim dive facility, and improvements to the lacrosse stadium and various other projects.

Need Florida football tickets?

The data presented here comes from financial reports the schools file with the NCAA. You may notice the numbers vary slightly from the Department of Education data I shared on Smarty Cents, but that’s because the reporting guidelines are slightly different. The reports filed with the NCAA are more accurate, but unfortunately they’re unavailable for private universities, because they aren’t subject to public records requests. Accordingly, I created the Top 10 list using Department of Education data (which does include private universities), but I’m sharing with you the more detailed data from the reports filed with the NCAA.

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Most Profitable #3

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #3 Georgia

Most Profitable #3I recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

For 10 business days, I’m going to break down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013. I’ve already posted #1 and #2.

#3 Georgia

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $22,514,767.00
Student Fees $154,189.00
Guarantees $0.00
Contributions $27,713,657.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $0.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions $14,546,066.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $5,725,235.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $1,304,015.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $5,632,768.00
Sport Camps $3,603.00
Endowment and Investment Income $0.00
Other $0.00
TOTAL
$77,594,300.00

Football Expenses

Athletic Student Aid (i.e., tuition, room and board) $2,466,052.00
Guarantees (amounts paid to visiting teams) $2,750,000.00
Head Coach Salary/Benefits/Bonuses $3,631,083.00
Asst Coaches Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $4,186,449.00
Support Staff Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $3,205,914.00
Severance Payments $0.00
Recruiting $581,531.00
Team Travel $1,373,215.00
Equipment, Uniforms and Supplies $687,579.00
Game Expenses $4,027,347.00
Fundraising, Marketing and Promotion $0.00
Sport Camps $0.00
Direct Facilities, Maintenance and Rental (costs charged to athletics for building and grounds maintenance, utilities, rental fees, operating leases, equipment repair and maintenance, and debt service) $3,014,260.00
Spirit Groups (support for bands, cheerleaders, mascots, dancers, etc.) $0.00
Indirect Facilities and Administrative Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the institution and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Medical Expenses and Medical Insurance $0.00
Memberships and Dues $0.00
Other $401,827.00
TOTAL $26,325,257.00

 

Where’s the $51.3 million in excess revenue from football? Along with excess revenue from men’s basketball, it essentially funded the rest of the athletic department, which includes 570 total student athletes. Sports outside of football and men’s basketball operated at a total loss of $16.4 million, and the department had another $40.1 million in expenses not directly attributable to just one team.

Georgia athletics also reported contributing $4.0 million to the University of Georgia for non-athletic initiatives, which resulted in Georgia athletics reporting an overall loss of $2.8 million for 2012-2013.

Need Georgia football tickets?

The data presented here comes from financial reports the schools file with the NCAA. You may notice the numbers vary slightly from the Department of Education data I shared on Smarty Cents, but that’s because the reporting guidelines are slightly different. The reports filed with the NCAA are more accurate, but unfortunately they’re unavailable for private universities, because they aren’t subject to public records requests. Accordingly, I created the Top 10 list using Department of Education data (which does include private universities), but I’m sharing with you the more detailed data from the reports filed with the NCAA.

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college football profit, college football revenue, college football expense

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #2 Michigan

college football profit, college football revenue, college football expenseI recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

For 10 business days, I’m going to break down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013. You can check out #1 here.

#2 Michigan

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $36,825,136.00
Student Fees $0.00
Guarantees (revenue from away games) $4,700,000.00
Contributions $25,312,201.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $0.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions $11,781,374.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $0.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $1,838,533.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $0.00
Sport Camps $0.00
Endowment and Investment Income $1,017,947.00
Other $0.00
TOTAL $81,475,191.00

Football Expenses

Athletic Student Aid (i.e., tuition, room and board) $4,518,037.00
Guarantees (amounts paid to visiting teams) $1,450,000.00
Head Coach Salary/Benefits/Bonuses $3,681,653.00
Asst Coaches Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $3,826,425.00
Support Staff Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $1,399,334.00
Severance Payments $0.00
Recruiting $664,492.00
Team Travel $2,304,097.00
Equipment, Uniforms and Supplies $966,074.00
Game Expenses $2,033,205.00
Fundraising, Marketing and Promotion $67,376.00
Sport Camps $0.00
Direct Facilities, Maintenance and Rental (costs charged to athletics for building and grounds maintenance, utilities, rental fees, operating leases, equipment repair and maintenance, and debt service) $0.00
Spirit Groups (support for bands, cheerleaders, mascots, dancers, etc.) $0.00
Indirect Facilities and Administrative Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the institution and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Medical Expenses and Medical Insurance $0.00
Memberships and Dues $2,935.00
Other $2,147,746.00
TOTAL $23,061,374.00

 

Curious where the excess $58.4 million in football revenue went? Check out my piece on Smarty Cents for the answer!

Need Michigan football tickets?

The data presented here comes from financial reports the schools file with the NCAA. You may notice the numbers vary slightly from the Department of Education data I shared on Smarty Cents, but that’s because the reporting guidelines are slightly different. The reports filed with the NCAA are more accurate, but unfortunately they’re unavailable for private universities, because they aren’t subject to public records requests. Accordingly, I created the Top 10 list using Department of Education data (which does include private universities), but I’m sharing with you the more detailed data from the reports filed with the NCAA.

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Most Profitable #1

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #1 Texas

Most Profitable #1I recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

For the next 10 business days, I’m going to break down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013.

#1 Texas

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $34,416,141.00
Student Fees $0.00
Guarantees $400,000.00
Contributions $30,273,294.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $0.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions (revenue from March Madness, conference television and sponsorship deals, etc.) $15,296,660.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $0.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $1,520,342.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $25,934,289.00
Sport Camps $325,875.00
Endowment and Investment Income $652,874.00
Other $580,224.00
TOTAL $109,399,699.00

Football Expenses Continue reading

College Football's Most Profitable

College Football’s Most Profitable Programs

College Football's Most ProfitableI have a new piece over on Smarty Cents explaining how college football programs generate revenue and how it’s all spent. Here’s a sneak peek at the Top 10 most profitable programs (although it’s not really profit since they’re nonprofits, it’s net revenue, but that doesn’t really roll off the tongue)….

  1. Texas
  2. Michigan
  3. Georgia
  4. Florida
  5. LSU
  6. Alabama
  7. Notre Dame
  8. Oklahoma
  9. Auburn
  10. Ohio State

For the numbers and a more detailed breakdown, check out my piece on Smarty Cents. I’ll have more posts here on related topics in the near future!

Neutral Site Game Payouts

Neutral Site College Football Game Payouts

Neutral Site Game PayoutsWhile technically the FBS football season kicked off last night with Abilene Christian at Georgia State, tonight we get some ranked teams and the Chick-Fil-A Kickoff Game!

For the past few years, the college football season has always started with neutral-site games. The two major ones have been the Chick-Fil-A Kickoff Classic (since 2008) and the Cowboys Classic (since 2009). This year there will be two Chick-Fil-A Kickoff games: Ole Miss vs. Boise State (tonight – August 28) and Alabama vs. West Virginia (August 30). There will also be one Cowboys Classic game which pits Florida State against Oklahoma State (August 30).

Neutral site games have proven to be extremely lucrative for the teams participating in them. When teams venture to the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, GA for the Chick-Fil-A Kickoff Classic or AT&T Stadium in Arlington, TX for the Cowboys Classic teams are typically giving up a lot; not only are they missing out on a potential home game, but they also lose all the revenues associated with hosting a home game such as ticket sales and concession sales. In addition, the surrounding area loses out on the revenues it usually makes when thousands of fans and alumni come into town for game day weekend. As such, payouts from these neutral site games have seemingly been enough to persuade teams to miss out on these potential earnings.

In last year’s Chick-Fil-A Kickoff, there was a total team payout to Alabama and Virginia Tech of $5 million. Typically, Alabama makes millions per game at Bryant-Denny Stadium, which seats over 101,000 people. Yet, the allure of being on center stage in a big city, coupled with the generous payouts has made playing in these games worthwhile. Alabama itself has played in 3 Chick-Fil-A Classics and 1 Cowboys Classic to date and is scheduled to play in one of this year’s Chick-Fil-A Classic games and next year’s Cowboys Classic. Furthermore, these games also have the potential to lure in key recruits as future players may be excited by the chance of playing for a big time school in a big time city.

Chick-Fil-A Kickoff

Year

Teams

Total Payout (Millions)

2008 Alabama vs. Clemson  $4.2
2009 Alabama vs. Virginia Tech $4.5
2010 LSU vs. North Carolina $3.6
2011 Boise State vs. Georgia $3.7
2012 Tennessee vs. NC State $4.2
2012 Auburn vs. Clemson $4.8
2013 Alabama vs. Virginia Tech $5.0
2014 Ole Miss vs. Boise State  $3.1
2014 Alabama vs. West Virginia $6.4 (expected)
2015 Louisville vs. Auburn  TBD

The payout for the Chick-Fil-A Kickoff Classic has increased over the past few years. In 2012, one game has total team payout of $4.2 million, whereas the other game had a total team payout of $4.8 million. This year, the total team payout for the Alabama and West Virginia game is expected to be $6.4 million. However, in 2008 and 2009, the total team payouts were $4.0 million and $4.5 million respectively, and then decreased in 2010 and 2011, to $3.6 million and $3.7 million respectively. Thus, there has not always been an upward trend in determining payouts. To determine the payout, Chick-Fil-A keeps its $5.5 budget and then returns the revenues above the budget to the participating teams.

Numbers for the Cowboys Classic have been more difficult to confirm, but here’s what we do know….

Cowboys Classic

Year Teams Per Team Breakdown (Millions)

Total Payout (Millions)

2009 BYU vs. Oklahoma
2010 TCU vs. Oregon State $1.0
2011 LSU vs. Oregon $3.5/$2.0 $5.5
2012 Alabama vs. Michigan $4.7/$4.7 $9.4
2013 LSU vs. TCU ?/$3.0
2014 FSU vs. Oklahoma State
2015 Alabama vs. Wisconsin
2016 USC vs. Alabama
2017 Michigan vs. Florida $6.0/$6.0 $12

The Cowboys Classic has also seen its payouts increase over the years. In 2011, LSU earned $3.5 million and Oregon earned $2.0 million, for a total team payout of $5.5 million. In 2012, Alabama and Michigan both made $4.7 million, for a total team payout of $9.4 million. In 2017, Michigan and Florida are each expected to make $6.0 million, for an expected total team payout of $12 million.

After observing these trends, it is obvious that payouts are varying not only from team-to-team but from year-to-year. One explanation is that the more lucrative and successful teams are being paid more to participate in these games because they help generate more revenue. Another explanation is that the more a team stands to lose in revenue from giving up a home game (i.e. Michigan and Alabama due to their huge stadium capacities), the more these neutral site games are willing to payout. One thing is for certain, though: the neutral-site kickoff game, with its lucrative payouts, will be around for many more years to come.

NCAA Report Shows Gap Between Haves and Have-Nots

Revenue and Expense Gap in College Athletics

NCAA Report Shows Gap Between Haves and Have-NotsThe divide between the haves and have-nots is increasing, expense growth is outpacing revenue growth, donors are still the largest source of revenue for most programs, and sports outside of football and men’s basketball aren’t generating enough revenue to cover expenses. That’s the short version of what the NCAA’s latest revenue and expense report tells us….

Click here for some interesting details from the report in my piece for Outkick the Coverage.

Ask SportsBizMiss (1)

Ask SportsBizMiss: volleyball profit, licensing naming rights, ticket revenue and government subsidies

Ask SportsBizMiss (1)Until now, we haven’t had a mailbag feature here at BusinessofCollegeSports.com, but I do check the search terms people use to find our site almost every day. So many times I wish I could reach out to the person and see if they found what they were looking for, but I don’t actually know who searched the term or how to get in touch with them…so, I’m going to pretend they emailed me and answer a few I’ve seen over the past week.

If you want to submit a question for a future edition of “Ask SportsBizMiss,” instructions are at the bottom of this post.

Here’s a sampling of searches I’ve seen over the past week….

“volleyball program turns profit”

If you were searching for a college volleyball program that turns a profit, you probably didn’t find one. It’s extremely rare for a sport outside of football or men’s basketball to end the year with net revenue (it’s not technically correct to call it “profit” since athletic departments are nonprofit entities). I’m asked about baseball and ice hockey most often, and you can find a program here or there that has a small amount of net revenue, but I’ve never seen a volleyball program with net revenue at the end of the year.

I decided to take a look at a couple of women’s programs first. Penn State and Texas finished last season ranked #1 and #2, so I checked out their financials for women’s volleyball:

School Revenue Expense Net Revenue
Penn State $850,993 $1,395,721 -$544,728
Texas $1,387,377 $3,177,635 -$1,790,258

Unfortunately, I don’t have the time to do this for every school, but I think you get the picture.

Men’s volleyball isn’t doing any better. Penn State’s men’s team only generated $222,044 but spent $346,791.

The fact of the matter is that few (and by few, I mean a handful) of programs outside of football and men’s basketball generate any net revenue. Many don’t make enough to cover scholarships for the student athletes within that sport, much less coaching salaries, trainers, insurance, travel, etc. I wrote last year about how even the top women’s basketball programs don’t generate enough revenue to cover their expenses.

So, sorry whoever searched this, but I doubt you’ll find any volleyball programs generating net revenue.

“licensing naming rights”

If you were looking for naming rights on stadiums, I have an entire database of every deal I know of in college athletics here.

If you were looking for the more recent issue of student athletes licensing their naming rights, the O’Bannon ruling didn’t give student athletes the right to license their own name individually. I think I analyzed O’Bannon from just about every angle and on just about every platform possible:

“ticket revenue Florida State”

This one is easy: $20.3 million total, $17.6 million from football. The Seminoles also had another $15.3 million in contributions to football, and no doubt much of that came from ticket-related contributions (those donations you have to make in order to buy season tickets, get better seats, etc.).

Need tickets to a Florida State game?

“government subsidies for athletics”

There seems to be great concern that state and local governments are subsidizing athletic departments, because the NCAA financial disclosure happens to include a category by this name. Don’t fret. Many times I’ve found the amount reported by an athletic department as support from governmental entities is lottery revenue earmarked for Title IX purposes, meaning it goes to fund scholarships for female student athletes. State and local governments aren’t just cutting checks to athletic departments to fund losses or otherwise bail them out. I looked at a couple of examples in my book, Saturday Millionaires, if you’re interested in learning more about this subject. You can download Chapter 1 for free here.

Any financial numbers I share are from financial disclosures each university files with the NCAA annually. The latest figures are from 2012-2013.

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