Category Archives: Finance

Roundin' Up the News

Roundin’ Up the News: Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Texas, Michigan and the Orange Bowl

Roundin' Up the News

Want more business of college sports news and analysis? Here are several publications we noticed mentioning our work this week:

Mississippi Rising: How Ole Miss, Mississippi State are capitalizing on a historic football season

What can Ole Miss and Mississippi State do with all the positive media attention and the increase in applications that’s sure to come? AL.com takes a look at the situation.

Dave Brandon at U-M: What Happened and What’s Next?

A comprehensive review of Brandon’s tenure at Michigan and what went wrong by the Detroit Free Press.

UT’s Football Program Is the Most Profitable in the Country. By a Lot.

A look at the finances of the University of Texas football program by Texas Monthly.

Capital One hits ESPN’s target for college football’s Orange Bowl ($)

Sports Sponsorship Insider interviewed The Business of College Sports founder Kristi Dosh on the value of bowl title sponsorships in this piece on Capital One’s new deal with the Orange Bowl. Subscription required.

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Nick Saban House

Crimson Tide Foundation Bought Nick Saban’s House

Nick Saban House

There’s an interesting piece over on AL.com today about the Crimson Tide Foundation purchasing Nick Saban’s 8,759 square foot house from him for $3.1 million shortly after Alabama beat Notre Dame for the national championship in January 2013. It’s probably not a coincidence that happened around the same time Saban was rumored to be speaking with Texas about its head coaching position.

Saban is currently banking $6.9 million annually under a new contract he signed earlier this year with Alabama that attempts to keep him as head coach through at least 2022, and now he has a house he can live in for the rest of his life rent free.

He’s worth every penny – and I say that as a Florida grad.

Click here to read more of my piece on Outkick the Coverage, where I detail Saban’s financial impact on University of Alabama.

Most Profitable #6

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #6 Alabama

Most Profitable #6I recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

Now, I’m breaking down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013. I’ve already posted #1 (Texas), #2 (Michigan), #3 (Georgia), #4 (Florida) and #5 LSU.

#6 Alabama

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $36,199,233.00
Student Fees $0.00
Guarantees $0.00
Contributions $18,864,861.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $203,412.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions $15,832,996.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $7,248,639.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $46,467.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $1,297,257.00
Sport Camps $584,616.00
Endowment and Investment Income $311,143.00
Other $8,097,317.00
TOTAL $88,685,941.00

Football Expenses

Athletic Student Aid (i.e., tuition, room and board) $3,632,607.00
Guarantees (amounts paid to visiting teams) $2,475,000.00
Head Coach Salary/Benefits/Bonuses $6,385,824.00
Asst Coaches Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $5,571,481.00
Support Staff Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $2,896,666.00
Severance Payments $141,476.00
Recruiting $983,721.00
Team Travel $3,432,188.00
Equipment, Uniforms and Supplies $1,576,657.00
Game Expenses $2,918,745.00
Fundraising, Marketing and Promotion $4,273,408.00
Sport Camps $647,774.00
Direct Facilities, Maintenance and Rental (costs charged to athletics for building and grounds maintenance, utilities, rental fees, operating leases, equipment repair and maintenance, and debt service) $2,579,734.00
Spirit Groups (support for bands, cheerleaders, mascots, dancers, etc.) $229,553.00
Indirect Facilities and Administrative Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the institution and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Medical Expenses and Medical Insurance $1,237,426.00
Memberships and Dues $2,506.00
Other $2,565,174.00
TOTAL $41,549,940.00

 

Alabama’s $47.1 million in net revenue from football is good enough for sixth in the nation behind Texas, Michigan, UGA, Florida and LSU. It was also plenty to cover the $14.9 million lost by sports other than football and men’s basketball (which had $5.8 million in net revenue). However, Alabama also reported $44.9 million in operating expenses not attributed to just one sport, offset by only $34 million in non-attributed revenue.

Like the other five athletic departments I’ve detailed at the top of this list, Alabama contributed back to the University for non-athletic initiatives to the tune of $5.9 million. After its expenses, the Crimson Tide reported $21.2 million in net revenue for the athletic department in 2012-2013.

Need Alabama football tickets?

The data presented here comes from financial reports the schools file with the NCAA. You may notice the numbers vary slightly from the Department of Education data I shared on Smarty Cents, but that’s because the reporting guidelines are slightly different. The reports filed with the NCAA are more accurate, but unfortunately they’re unavailable for private universities, because they aren’t subject to public records requests. Accordingly, I created the Top 10 list using Department of Education data (which does include private universities), but I’m sharing with you the more detailed data from the reports filed with the NCAA.

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Most profitable #5

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #5 LSU

Most profitable #5I recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

For the next few weeks, I’m going to break down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013. I’ve already posted #1 (Texas), #2 (Michigan), #3 (Georgia) and #4 (Florida).

#5 LSU

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $33,171,661.00
Student Fees $0.00
Guarantees $0.00
Contributions $21,786,240.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $635,895.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions $15,913,422.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $0.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $2,768,620.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $0.00
Sport Camps $0.00
Endowment and Investment Income $0.00
Other $0.00
TOTAL $74,275,838.00

Football Expenses

Athletic Student Aid (i.e., tuition, room and board) $3,080,962.00
Guarantees (amounts paid to visiting teams) $2,885,000.00
Head Coach Salary/Benefits/Bonuses $4,290,781.00
Asst Coaches Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $5,871,695.00
Support Staff Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $1,520,744.00
Severance Payments $8,398.00
Recruiting $577,442.00
Team Travel $1,036,267.00
Equipment, Uniforms and Supplies $1,133,395.00
Game Expenses $886,826.00
Fundraising, Marketing and Promotion $194,927.00
Sport Camps $0.00
Direct Facilities, Maintenance and Rental (costs charged to athletics for building and grounds maintenance, utilities, rental fees, operating leases, equipment repair and maintenance, and debt service) $14,784.00
Spirit Groups (support for bands, cheerleaders, mascots, dancers, etc.) $0.00
Indirect Facilities and Administrative Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the institution and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Medical Expenses and Medical Insurance $176,138.00
Memberships and Dues $35,609.00
Other $4,109,260.00
TOTAL $25,822,228.00

The Tigers banked $48.5 million in net revenue from football in 2012-2013 – plenty to cover the $15.7 million lost by sports other than football and men’s basketball (which had $2.6 million in net revenue). However, LSU also reported $50 million in expenses not attributed to just one sport, offset by only $26.9 million in non-attributed revenue.

Like the other four athletic departments I’ve detailed at the top of this list, LSU contributed back to the University for non-athletic initiatives. The Tigers inked a check for $4.7 million and ended the 2012-2013 reporting year $7.5 million in the black.

Need LSU football tickets?

The data presented here comes from financial reports the schools file with the NCAA. You may notice the numbers vary slightly from the Department of Education data I shared on Smarty Cents, but that’s because the reporting guidelines are slightly different. The reports filed with the NCAA are more accurate, but unfortunately they’re unavailable for private universities, because they aren’t subject to public records requests. Accordingly, I created the Top 10 list using Department of Education data (which does include private universities), but I’m sharing with you the more detailed data from the reports filed with the NCAA.

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Most Profitable #4

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #4 Florida

Most Profitable #4I recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

For the next few weeks, I’m going to break down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013. I’ve already posted #1#2 and #3.

#4 Florida

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $21,390,665.00
Student Fees $0.00
Guarantees $500,000.00
Contributions $34,052,885.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $200,000.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions $16,815,708.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $0.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $1,060,624.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $825,582.00
Sport Camps $172,094.00
Endowment and Investment Income $0.00
Other $2,729.00
TOTAL $75,020,287.00

Football Expenses

Athletic Student Aid (i.e., tuition, room and board) $2,490,319.00
Guarantees (amounts paid to visiting teams) $2,700,000.00
Head Coach Salary/Benefits/Bonuses $3,063,405.00
Asst Coaches Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $3,899,761.00
Support Staff Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $1,475,809.00
Severance Payments $146,643.00
Recruiting $687,227.00
Team Travel $3,525,976.00
Equipment, Uniforms and Supplies $602,848.00
Game Expenses $4,024,092.00
Fundraising, Marketing and Promotion $223,983.00
Sport Camps $171,209.00
Direct Facilities, Maintenance and Rental (costs charged to athletics for building and grounds maintenance, utilities, rental fees, operating leases, equipment repair and maintenance, and debt service) $928,616.00
Spirit Groups (support for bands, cheerleaders, mascots, dancers, etc.) $847,035.00
Indirect Facilities and Administrative Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the institution and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Medical Expenses and Medical Insurance $279,007.00
Memberships and Dues $0.00
Other $838,623.00
TOTAL $25,904,553.00

 

If you’ve done the math, you noticed football produced excess revenue of $49.1 million. What happens to that money? Along with excess revenue from men’s basketball, it essentially funded the rest of the athletic department, which includes 523 total student athletes. Sports outside of football and men’s basketball operated at a total loss of $46.7 million, and the department had another $47 million in expenses not directly attributable to just one team, including nearly $16 million in facilities expenses (rent, utilities, maintenance, etc.).

Florida athletics also reported contributing $7.6 million to the University of Florida for non-athletic initiatives. However, thanks to $28 million in revenue not directly attributable to one sport, including nearly $6 million in endowment and investment income, and almost $16 million from television and radio (not generated at the conference level but from UF’s individual deals) and royalties/licensing revenue, the athletic department had overall net revenue of $15.5 million after its contribution to the University.

So, Florida athletics has excess revenue of $15.5 million just padding its bank account, right? Not really. It’s important to note $11.3 million of the revenue reported for 2012-2013 was generated from capital contributions – in other words, fundraising campaigns specifically for facilities projects. According to audited financials, those capital contributions were raised for the renovation of the Stephen C. O’Connell Center, the “Gateway of Champions” football front door project, renovation of the Carse swim dive facility, and improvements to the lacrosse stadium and various other projects.

Need Florida football tickets?

The data presented here comes from financial reports the schools file with the NCAA. You may notice the numbers vary slightly from the Department of Education data I shared on Smarty Cents, but that’s because the reporting guidelines are slightly different. The reports filed with the NCAA are more accurate, but unfortunately they’re unavailable for private universities, because they aren’t subject to public records requests. Accordingly, I created the Top 10 list using Department of Education data (which does include private universities), but I’m sharing with you the more detailed data from the reports filed with the NCAA.

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Most Profitable #3

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #3 Georgia

Most Profitable #3I recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

Over the next few weeks, I’m going to break down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013. I’ve already posted #1 and #2.

#3 Georgia

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $22,514,767.00
Student Fees $154,189.00
Guarantees $0.00
Contributions $27,713,657.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $0.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions $14,546,066.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $5,725,235.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $1,304,015.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $5,632,768.00
Sport Camps $3,603.00
Endowment and Investment Income $0.00
Other $0.00
TOTAL
$77,594,300.00

Football Expenses

Athletic Student Aid (i.e., tuition, room and board) $2,466,052.00
Guarantees (amounts paid to visiting teams) $2,750,000.00
Head Coach Salary/Benefits/Bonuses $3,631,083.00
Asst Coaches Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $4,186,449.00
Support Staff Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $3,205,914.00
Severance Payments $0.00
Recruiting $581,531.00
Team Travel $1,373,215.00
Equipment, Uniforms and Supplies $687,579.00
Game Expenses $4,027,347.00
Fundraising, Marketing and Promotion $0.00
Sport Camps $0.00
Direct Facilities, Maintenance and Rental (costs charged to athletics for building and grounds maintenance, utilities, rental fees, operating leases, equipment repair and maintenance, and debt service) $3,014,260.00
Spirit Groups (support for bands, cheerleaders, mascots, dancers, etc.) $0.00
Indirect Facilities and Administrative Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the institution and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Medical Expenses and Medical Insurance $0.00
Memberships and Dues $0.00
Other $401,827.00
TOTAL $26,325,257.00

 

Where’s the $51.3 million in excess revenue from football? Along with excess revenue from men’s basketball, it essentially funded the rest of the athletic department, which includes 570 total student athletes. Sports outside of football and men’s basketball operated at a total loss of $16.4 million, and the department had another $40.1 million in expenses not directly attributable to just one team.

Georgia athletics also reported contributing $4.0 million to the University of Georgia for non-athletic initiatives, which resulted in Georgia athletics reporting an overall loss of $2.8 million for 2012-2013.

Need Georgia football tickets?

The data presented here comes from financial reports the schools file with the NCAA. You may notice the numbers vary slightly from the Department of Education data I shared on Smarty Cents, but that’s because the reporting guidelines are slightly different. The reports filed with the NCAA are more accurate, but unfortunately they’re unavailable for private universities, because they aren’t subject to public records requests. Accordingly, I created the Top 10 list using Department of Education data (which does include private universities), but I’m sharing with you the more detailed data from the reports filed with the NCAA.

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college football profit, college football revenue, college football expense

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #2 Michigan

college football profit, college football revenue, college football expenseI recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

Over the next few weeks, I’m going to break down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013. You can check out #1 here.

#2 Michigan

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $36,825,136.00
Student Fees $0.00
Guarantees (revenue from away games) $4,700,000.00
Contributions $25,312,201.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $0.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions $11,781,374.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $0.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $1,838,533.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $0.00
Sport Camps $0.00
Endowment and Investment Income $1,017,947.00
Other $0.00
TOTAL $81,475,191.00

Football Expenses

Athletic Student Aid (i.e., tuition, room and board) $4,518,037.00
Guarantees (amounts paid to visiting teams) $1,450,000.00
Head Coach Salary/Benefits/Bonuses $3,681,653.00
Asst Coaches Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $3,826,425.00
Support Staff Salaries/Benefits/Bonuses $1,399,334.00
Severance Payments $0.00
Recruiting $664,492.00
Team Travel $2,304,097.00
Equipment, Uniforms and Supplies $966,074.00
Game Expenses $2,033,205.00
Fundraising, Marketing and Promotion $67,376.00
Sport Camps $0.00
Direct Facilities, Maintenance and Rental (costs charged to athletics for building and grounds maintenance, utilities, rental fees, operating leases, equipment repair and maintenance, and debt service) $0.00
Spirit Groups (support for bands, cheerleaders, mascots, dancers, etc.) $0.00
Indirect Facilities and Administrative Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the institution and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Medical Expenses and Medical Insurance $0.00
Memberships and Dues $2,935.00
Other $2,147,746.00
TOTAL $23,061,374.00

 

Curious where the excess $58.4 million in football revenue went? Check out my piece on Smarty Cents for the answer!

Need Michigan football tickets?

The data presented here comes from financial reports the schools file with the NCAA. You may notice the numbers vary slightly from the Department of Education data I shared on Smarty Cents, but that’s because the reporting guidelines are slightly different. The reports filed with the NCAA are more accurate, but unfortunately they’re unavailable for private universities, because they aren’t subject to public records requests. Accordingly, I created the Top 10 list using Department of Education data (which does include private universities), but I’m sharing with you the more detailed data from the reports filed with the NCAA.

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Most Profitable #1

Most Profitable College Football Programs: #1 Texas

Most Profitable #1I recently wrote a piece for Smarty Cents about the finances of college football programs – where does the money come from (other than television), where does it go and who makes the most?

Over the next few weeks, I’m going to break down the Top 10 most profitable (with nonprofits it’s technically net revenue, not profit, but that doesn’t roll off the tongue) college football programs from 2012-2013.

#1 Texas

Football Revenues

Ticket Sales $34,416,141.00
Student Fees $0.00
Guarantees $400,000.00
Contributions $30,273,294.00
Compensation and Benefits Provided by a Third Party (car stipend, country club membership, entertainment allowance, clothing allowance, speaking fees, housing allowance, compensation from camps, radio/tv income, and shoe and apparel income) $0.00
Indirect Institutional Support (the value of facilities and services provided by the university and not charged to athletics) $0.00
Direct Institutional Support (institutional resources provided for athletics and unrestricted funds allocated to athletics by the university) $0.00
Government Support $0.00
NCAA and Conference Distributions (revenue from March Madness, conference television and sponsorship deals, etc.) $15,296,660.00
Broadcast, Television, Radio and Internet Rights (those not covered by conference-wide contracts) $0.00
Program Sales, Concessions, Novelty Sales and Parking $1,520,342.00
Royalties, Licensing, Advertisements and Sponsorships $25,934,289.00
Sport Camps $325,875.00
Endowment and Investment Income $652,874.00
Other $580,224.00
TOTAL $109,399,699.00

Football Expenses Continue reading

College Football's Most Profitable

College Football’s Most Profitable Programs

College Football's Most ProfitableI have a new piece over on Smarty Cents explaining how college football programs generate revenue and how it’s all spent. Here’s a sneak peek at the Top 10 most profitable programs (although it’s not really profit since they’re nonprofits, it’s net revenue, but that doesn’t really roll off the tongue)….

  1. Texas
  2. Michigan
  3. Georgia
  4. Florida
  5. LSU
  6. Alabama
  7. Notre Dame
  8. Oklahoma
  9. Auburn
  10. Ohio State

For the numbers and a more detailed breakdown, check out my piece on Smarty Cents. I’ll have more posts here on related topics in the near future!